Smile, Cannabinoids are Working Better than Standard Products for Oral Care

Cannabinoids are more effective in reducing bacterial plaque than synthetic oral care products such as Oral B or Colgate, found research conducted by Euro Dent
Belgium.

Dental plaque is a biofilm-forming on the teeth and acting as a reservoir of microbes. It causes severe dental problems and diseases, including cavities, bad breath, bleeding gums, tooth decay, and tooth loss. It formes on the tooth surface and gum line, and includes thousands of bacteria that convert food residues into acids, eventually leading to the initiation of dental diseases such as dental caries, gingivitis, and periodontal diseases. Periodontitis or gum disease is a global public health problem that affects millions of people each year and is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults.

The study was conducted on sixty adults aged 18 to 45 years, who were categorized into six groups based on the Dutch periodontal screening index and depending on the severity of their oral state. A randomized controlled trial reviewed and cleared by the Ethics Committee of the Institutional Review Board was conducted from January 2019 to March 2019. Dental plaques of the adults were collected using paro-toothpick sticks and spread on two Petri dishes, each with four divisions. On Petri dish-A, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabichromene (CBC), cannabinol (CBN), and cannabigerol (CBG) was used, and on Petri dish-B, cannabigerol acid (CBGA), Oral B, Colgate, and Cannabite F (a toothpaste formulation of pomegranate and algae) were used. The Petri dishes were sealed and incubated, followed by counting the number of colonies.

As a result of evaluating the colony count of the dental bacteria isolated from six groups, it was found that cannabinoids were more effective in reducing the bacterial colony count in dental plaques as compared to the well-established synthetic oral care products such as Oral B and Colgate.

Personalized next-generation oral care products

When observing the results on the example of a person with no gum problems, the maximum number of colonies was found with the Oral B treatment, whereas the minimum number of colonies was present in the CBN treatment. With a sample that was taken from a person with gingivitis, the maximum number of colonies was found in Oral B treatment and the minimum number was present in the CBC treatment. Where gingivitis was more severe, the maximum number of colonies was found in the Colgate treatment and the minimum number was found in the CBC treatment. With mild periodontitis, the maximum number of colonies was found in the Oral B treatment and the minimum number in the CBGA treatment. With more severe periodontitis, the maximum number of colonies was found in the Oral B treatment and the minimum number was present in the CBN treatment. Finally, when observing the results for the most severe oral condition with severe bone resorption and high tooth mobility, the maximum number of colonies was present in the Oral B treatment and the minimum number was found in the CBN treatment. In all six research groups studied, the maximum bacterial growth was observed in Oral B, Colgate, and Cannabite F treatments. The colony count in cannabinoid treatments were all significantly lower than that recorded in any of the toothpaste tested. Among the cannabinoids tested, CBN and CBC were effective in several research groups.

The authors believe this study opens up the possibilities of developing personalized next-generation oral care products based on cannabinoids.

Reviewed by Sasha Bajilo, founder of ILESOL Pharmaceuticals, an industrial scale producer of CBD products and formulations. Expert on Hemp/Cannabis policy, member of the Croatian Ministry of Health regulatory commission for medical cannabis.